Reflections? Gardens? Palatka City

August 23, 2010 at 10:52 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

 

Reflections-Palatka Ravine Gardens

Seems like I should adopt “Do not be confused” as my slogan! 

 There are three similar paintings with three similar names in the collection but the one published as a Limited Edition was named Gardens-Palatka City by the artist. If the links are broken please just go to the PAINTINGS pages until I can correct my goof. 

 I  hope you haven’t been holding your breath waiting for me to correct this ‘goof’ .  I just discovered I never announced the availibilty of prints of Wm. J. Carpenter’s painting Gardens-Palatka City  in the Print Gallery.  Click here to see the latest.  Jack

Gardens-Palatka City

August 23, 2010 at 10:19 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Here is another of  Wm. J. Carpenter’s watercolor paintings.

Reflections-Palatka Ravine Gardens

 Gardens-Palatka City  completes the trilogy of Northeast Florida’s Palatka Ravine Gardens scenes created during the Depression days of the 1930s by Wm. J. Carpenter, AIA.  This reflection pond, encircled by tall cypress and palm trees is near the end of the road tour of the gardens and is designed to send the visitor on his way with a lasting image of the natural beauty of the Park.

 Now that you have seen all three of the paintings available as Limited Edition prints you may want to acquire one or more of them to hang in your Wm. J. Carpenter designed building or in your home.  For more on their availability check the Print Gallery.

On the River St. Johns Painting

August 15, 2010 at 2:50 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

 This painting https://jackncb.wordpress.com/paintings/on-the-river-st-johns/is another of architect Wm. J. Carpenter’s small watercolor paintings that he produced for the tourist trade in Daytona Beach, Florida during the Great Depression of the 1930s. These paintings were done in his casual days after a  successful architectural career in El Paso, Texas, Spokane, Washington, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,and St. Petersburg and DeLand, Florida. On the River St. Johns  

 The charming scene includes a romantic couple and canoe complete with fishing pole very reminiscent of the architect’s youth in England.  Limited Edition prints of this painting , published and signed by grandson Jack Carpenter are available from the Print Gallery.

Masonic Temple-DeLand

August 8, 2010 at 4:30 pm | Posted in DeLand & Volusia County, Paintings | Leave a comment

 

MASONIC TEMPLE-DeLAND

Masonic Temple-DeLand Wm. J. Carpenter, AIA 1926

  Wm. J. Carpenter designed this state-of-the-art 3-story lodge building for the DeLand, Florida Masonic Lodge members in 1926.  At the time it was recognized as the finest lodge facility in the State of Florida.  The upper two floors were devoted to Lodge business and offices and the ground floor to commercial ventures, including the Florida Motor Lines Bus Station, the Orange Belt Pharmacy, and others.  Even so, the Lodge fell on hard times during the depression and lost the facility to foreclosure. 

Mr. Leo Alsheimer, who was the contractor on this building, was also the contractor for several of the Volusia County schools designed by Wm. J. Carpenter during the days of the Florida Boom in the mid 1920s.

A white elephant for years, it’s historical  significance has been recognized and today it is being preserved as a historical landmark, while being operated as a commercial venture.  Click here to read more.

St. Andrews Episcopal Church

August 1, 2010 at 9:41 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The historic St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania was designed by Carpenter & Crocker in 1906.  Wm. J. Carpenter, as the lead architect, employed a restrained form of Gothic revival style reminiscent of the churches he had known in his native England.

St. Andrews Episcopal Church From an early postcard

Several stained glass windows by Pittsburgh artists and one by Tiffany Studios are noted features of this building.  Other outstanding architectural features are discussed in the Architecture pages.  Click here.

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.